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Posted 09.22.11 | PERMALINK | ESSAY

Laura Tepper: Road Ecology: Wildlife Habitat and Highway Design



The first phase of wildlife infrastructure at Banff, along a 28-mile pilot corridor, includes 11 underpasses of four distinct types (creek bridges, elliptical metal culverts, prefabricated concrete boxes and an open-span concrete bridge) and miles of eight-foot-high fencing to funnel animals toward the crossings. The bridge shown here creates a 33-foot underpass favored by deer and coyotes. Although wildlife crossings have been built elsewhere, the Banff Project is unique because of the extensive research associated with it, which has generated the world’s largest data set on wildlife use of highway crossings.

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ABOUT THE ESSAY

Road Ecology: Wildlife Habitat and Highway Design
On Places, Laura Tepper looks at the emerging field of road ecology and its influence on a new generation of highway landscape design.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Laura Tepper explored highway landscapes on a traveling fellowship from UC Berkeley. She practices landscape design in San Francisco.
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