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SLIDESHOW: Image 2/36
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Posted 07.15.13 | PERMALINK | ESSAY

Mark Klett: Camino del Diablo



Daybreak, Cabeza Prieta Mountains. Click image to enlarge.

Our route lay for two or three days, as far as the Altar river, over hard, gravelly plains, generally bearing grass and scattered mesquit trees and cacti. The Altar river is a mere rivulet at nearly all seasons, but along its course are many places which might become flourishing ranches, were not all attempts at industry rendered hopeless by the raids of the Apache. Following the river we reached Altar, a village built of adobes, and containing a population of about 1,900 souls, including the ranches of the inmediate neighborhood. The productions of this part of Sonora are chiefly maize, wheat, barley, beans, and some sugar and tobacco. Watermelons are raised in large numbers. A solitary date-palm, standing near Altar, is evidence of the attempts of the early missionaries to introduce fruits which seemed suited to the climate.

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ABOUT THE ESSAY

Camino del Diablo
On Places, photographer Mark Klett journeys along the Camino del Diablo in the Sonoran Desert, much of which is now a bombing range, and finds a landscape of forbidding danger and compelling beauty.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Klett is Regents' Professor of Art at Arizona State University and a contributing editor of Places. His latest book is The Half-Life of History. 
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