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Posted 12.09.10 | PERMALINK | ESSAY

Keith Eggener: Building on Burial Ground



St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, Louisiana (1789). Photo ca. 1901.

In contrast to most American burial grounds, where nature provides the keynote, it is architecture that dominates New Orleans's cemeteries. In this regard they are similar to urban cemeteries in France or Italy. Few trees or shrubs appear along the grid of narrow paths and streets. Instead, small stone houses (most of them actually made of plaster-covered brick), in various revival styles, crowd together in a sort of facsimile of the nearby city of the living.

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ABOUT THE ESSAY

Building on Burial Ground
On Places, architectural historian Keith Eggener looks at American graveyards and cemeteries past and present, from Mount Auburn to Forest Lawn to contemporary LCD-enabled eulogies.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Keith Eggener is the Marion Dean Ross Distinguished Professor of Architectural History at the University of Oregon, and a contributing editor of Places. 
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