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Gallery: Sandra Vivanco

Latin America: A New Generation of Women Architects



Clockwise from top left, works by Tatiano Bilbao, Rozana Montiel, Sandra Vivanco and Nora Enriquez.

A new generation of Latin American women designers has emerged in the past couple of decades. The work of several exemplary firms has been curated by architect Nora Enriquez for an exhibition, Space Through Gender, now on view in San Francisco and, in an abbreviated version, in the accompanying slideshow. The practices and projects span two continents and several countries. From Mexico there are architects Tatiana Bilbao, Fernanda Canales, Frida Escobedo LopezRozana Montiel and Enriquez herself, who practices in San Francisco. From Chile there is Rocio Romero, now based in St. Louis, and from Argentina Galia Solomonoff, who works and teaches in New York City. Catalina Patiño and Viviana Peña, of the collective Ctrl G, and Ana Elvira Velez, all practice in Medellín. Colombia. Carla Juacaba is based in Brazil, and Perú is represented by the work of my Bay Area firm, A+D: Architecture + Design



 
To a large extent this latest generation is empowered by rising prosperity and new stability. After the difficult decades of the 1970s and '80s — when the region struggled with weak democracies and the after-effects of dictatorships, with financial uncertainty, drug trafficking and civil wars, and with the exodus of intellectuals and artists — the countries of Central and South America are enjoying greater security and significant investments of both foreign capital and domestic resources. And the need to reconstruct national images, to rebuild cultural identities to reflect the greater freedom and affluence, has prompted new interest in architecture and urban design and the reinvigoration of civic space.

Yet women architects in Latin America — as in North America — continue to confront gender-based inequities. Partly this seems due to entrenched cultural attitudes, and partly to the traditional connections between architecture, engineering and capital, which can make it difficult to progress to a less patriarchal culture of building and design. In my native Perú, to note just one example, women make up more than 50 percent of the classes in architecture schools but only 25 percent of registered architects; and only about three percent of firm principals are women. [1]

As Nora Enriquez puts it, in her introduction to the exhibition: "Recognition of women’s impact on the world of design has been slow.... In Latin America, the first generation of influential women in architecture is just beginning to emerge." Space Through Gender spotlights some of this vital new work, and it also spurs us to revisit a perennial question: Does gender matter in the design of buildings and landscapes?



Editors' Note

This feature is drawn from Space Through Gender, an exhibition organized by architect Nora Enriquez and on view at the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts in San Francisco from August 25 through September 29, 2012.

On September 24, at the California College of Arts, Viviana Peña and Catalina Patiño of Ctrl G will lecture at the California College of Arts in San Francisco, and Sandra Vivanco, Galia Solomonoff, and Frida Escobedo, whose work is also part of the exhibition, will join Ila Berman, director of architecture at CCA, for a panel discussion.


Notes

1. Statistics on women in architecture in Latin America are scarce and difficult to locate. The 25 percent figure is based on examining recent membership records from the Colegio de Arquitectos del Perú. The three percent figure is also an estimate, based on cross-referencing the membership records with another list of Peruvian firms. The 50 percent figure for students is cited by the architect Javier Sota Nadal in an article written to commemorate the centennial of the profession in Perú. 

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Comments (4)   |   JUMP TO MOST RECENT >>

Great job! Amazing work.
kcsprojects
09.15.12 at 05:51

Fantastic exhibition. I'm particularly loving the unpretentious modernism of Frida Escobedo Lopez.
drawjosh
09.17.12 at 03:43

What inspirational work! As a peruvian woman, recently graduating with BA in architecture in the U.S. I can only imagine their strength against the current of obstacles they've encountered and completely relate. Ive also noticed, living in the U.S.( progressive in comparison) the scarcity of women educators, but fortunate to have seen Fridas lecture on her work. I am profoundly inspired to see these successes!
cloudesign
09.17.12 at 10:27

A nice introduction to some truly great projects and architects. I would also suggest looking at Chilean architect Cecilia Puga's work - there's a 2G monograph on her that's very good.
Javier Zeller
09.19.12 at 06:12



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ABOUT THE SLIDESHOW

A portfolio of works by the rising generation of Latin American women architects.
View Slideshow >>

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sandra Vivanco is principal of the San Francisco based firm, A+D, Architecture+Design, and Associate Professor of Architecture and Cultural Diversity at the California College of the Arts.
More Bio >>

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